You’ve posted a new job position at your company and have completed the interviewing process. What a wonderful feeling!

The not so wonderful part?

You have whittled down the selection to two seemingly equal candidates.

While it’s exciting that you have more than one qualified potential employee, it is not so thrilling that you now have to tell one that they’re not the one.

This is especially challenging if you do not yet know how to choose between the two!

But don’t worry, we’re here to help. Follow our five tips to choosing between two incredible job candidates, and you’ll never go wrong.

Reflect on the Candidates’ Enthusiasm

Not everyone reacts enthusiastically during a job interview, and that doesn’t mean they don’t deserve the job. Most job seekers are incredibly nervous during the interview and probably aren’t acting very naturally as a result.

But enthusiasm is one of those feelings that shines through, nervous or not. And it just happens to be an essential trait when hiring a new employee.

Think back to the interviews and really reflect on each candidate’s level of excitement and interest when talking to you, talking about themselves, and discussing the job role.

Odds are, one was more enthused than the other. This can be a crucial distinction, because you want to work with someone who is hungry for the opportunity and looking to impress.

And authentically enthusiastic candidates are the most likely to become dependable team members.

Who Fits Your Company’s Culture Best?

This is a toughie to weigh during the interview or even when reviewing their application. But it is key to consider which of the two applicants will fit in better with your other team members at your place of employment.

So what do we mean by a candidate who fits in with your company’s culture? This pertains to the personality, experience, and capabilities of the candidate, and how well they may mesh with your other employees and your workplace vibe.

If you’re unsure who fits in better with your company culture, always check in with their references.

If one stood out to a former employee for a specific negative reason that affected the candidate socially while at work, you need to consider this. This is especially true if their former workplace seems much like your own.

And if one had a seamless transition from brand new employee to dedicated team mate, well then, there is no reason why that should not be the case at your business, too.

Let Your Instincts Guide You

Whether you’ve been a hiring manager for minutes or decades, you know how crucial following your instincts can be in this line of work.

No one should make snap judgements based on first impressions. Though if you’re reading this, you obviously do not do that, and you know that an instinct can be a tiny, though crucial, part of the selection of the process!

If you suspect something seems a little off about one candidate, there is a good indication that something is, even if you do not know what it is yet.

Same goes if your instincts tell you that one candidate stands out in even a slightly more positive way.

It may seem silly to make such a critical decision based on a feeling, but it should be a part of your process, along with rigorously evaluating all of their other aspects, of course.

Thoroughly Assess Your Company’s Future

Anticipating your company’s future needs can be enormously helpful in refining your candidate selection. One candidate is surely stronger in one key aspect than the other, you’ve just may not have realized it yet.

But what does a job candidate’s past and present necessarily have to do with your future? It can be advantageous to take their standout attributes, credentials, and goals and measure it against where your company is headed.

For example, maybe your company is taking on new clients and tons of impressive projects are just around the bend for you and your team.

Now consider how each prospective employee answered that mother of all job interview questions, “what do you consider your greatest weakness?”

If one of your two candidates described their main weak point as being “disorganized” or “having poor time management”, they probably weren’t just being modest. (If you are struggling to choose between two incredible candidates, we’re assuming they didn’t both answer that way at least!)

These answers are red flags that indicate that, despite their other winning qualities, this person may drop the ball when it comes to wowing new clients.

This can hurt your company and your clients immediately and in the long run.

Can You Meet *Their* Needs?

You’re probably not the only one interested in these two incredible job candidates. Both have likely applied to several jobs, taken numerous interviews, and are weighing different job offers.

You may know how you feel in terms of what they offer your business. But have you put serious thought into what you offer them?

Since you’ve narrowed it down to these two, be sure you know their requirements, particularly in terms of pay and benefits.

Can your company meet these, for both or either candidate?

If one is particularly out of the range you can offer, and neither side can be flexible, then you have to say goodbye to that person.

Ideally, one meets all the positive sides of our tips listed above and is happy with the salary and benefits you require! It’s all part of the selection process that makes your job difficult but so rewarding.

Conclusion

It’s incredibly tough choosing between two amazing job candidates. But you must do it! After following these steps, hopefully your job is a bit easier.

And remember: you do not have to say farewell for good.

Be sure to have a graceful and authentic parting with the candidate you are not hiring. You never know, they may become your top choice not too far down the road.

Angus Flynn is the Business Manager for Village Greens of Queen Creek.  With over 5 years of experience in the multifamily industry, he is one of the most dedicated managers in his field. He loves to help others and takes great pride in working in a community that so many love to call home.